Tag Archives: Military

Evaluating Data and US Military Intervention

The Economy: The numbers released this week underscore the difficulty in evaluating the economy. Consumer confidence is at all-time highs; as is bullish sentiment. Auto Sales disappointed. ADP Jobs report on Wednesday were blow-out; far above expectations. Yet the very similar NonFarm Payrolls were far below expectations on Friday. Oil has rallied, dipped and rallied back on each OPEC announcement. Fed Minutes were released and showed a more hawkish stance towards raising interest rates. They also contained a comment that stocks may be overvalued. The nuclear option on Gorsuch was exercised without causing a ripple. This is the conundrum of soft versus hard data. Soft data is about how you feel or what you think. Hard data is information that has some basis in statistics. With the manipulation of statistics you now have to frame hard data in terms of what might be fake news. For example, are any numbers provided by the Chinese Communist Party real? For better or worse, they certainly drive the markets. For the U.S. the consensus is that the Trump rally is intact regardless of the healthcare fail, the headwinds of tax reform, a looming trade war with China and as of today, a possible hot war with Syria/Russia. We continue to hear that regardless of the macro picture, bank lending standards remain tight.

Food for Thought: The relentless upward bias of the stock market stumbled Wednesday when the Fed Minutes were released. Two comments were taken as bearish for stocks. First, further interest rate hikes are coming in 2017. Second, the statement that stocks may be overvalued was viewed as a warning. Together, these comments stopped the rally and caused the largest reversal in 15-months. Markets closed down dramatically. But like so many other issues that should have paused this bull market, the reversal was forgotten overnight. Stocks had a positive day as the prospect of a Syrian war and the adage, “buy on the sound of cannons, sell on the sound of trumpets” was heard. Last week Tillerson indicated that Syria was best left to the Syrians. Today, Trump bombed ‘em. U.S. military intervention in Syria. Perhaps it’s the Art of The Deal, but it seems that there’s a lot of U.S. saber rattling going on. We have U.S. troops in Poland, on the Russian border, for the first time in history. We’ve turned-up the anti-Russian volume on Ukraine. We’re threatening North Korea with unilateral action. We’re flashing the sabers at China over the South China Sea. Perhaps the Central Banker stock market, which has morphed into the Trump Bump market will evolve into the global war market. To Infinity and Beyond.

Music of the Week: Billy Idol’s “Charmed Life”

The Eve of the Inauguration

The Economy: The U.S. economic numbers continue to indicate that things are picking up bigly. Housing starts are up. The Philly Fed Manufacturing Index is up. Jobless claims are near their lows. Earnings season is in full swing but the economic data this week is overshadowed by the inauguration. Davos, the annual financial confab was held this week. The group, which is noted for its strong support of globalization, is trying to adjust to the new reality in Washington. Team Trump was notably absent. The message is consistent whether it be to the Davos Elite, the State Department, the Intelligence Community, the Press or any of the other sacred cows of the past 100-years: “Your days of self-aggrandizement are over.”

Food for Thought: On the eve of the inauguration, it feels like Y2K on New Year’s Eve 1999. Even the weather is the same with drenching rains that flooded parties. Half the U.S. is apparently convinced that this is the second coming. Half that it’s Armageddon. It’ll be something in between. One thing is for sure, for the first time in decades, hard-nosed business men and women will be running the U.S. government with military men in charge at the Department of Defense. We expect change to come hard and fast.

Music of the Week: Sade “Promise”

Post-Election Circus

The Economy: The U.S. economy appears to be accelerating while the global economy turns in mixed numbers. If this divergence continues, it may be the U.S. that serves as the engine of growth that keeps a global recession at bay. While the U.S. anticipates continued acceleration due to Trump tax cuts and fiscal stimulus, the EU faces more economic uncertainty as Italeave and Irexit appear to be set for a vote. Uncertainty is the bane of financial markets as participants postpone decisions until there is greater clarity. The feedback loop can create a self-fulling prophecy. The upheaval in Washington was reflected in a bond market route that is unlike anything we’ve seen in years. Rapidly rising rates would negatively impact large sectors of our economy such as housing and autos. Uncertainty also surrounds the Fed meeting in December. Though financial markets have supposedly priced-in a ¼ percent interest rate hike, animosity between Fed Chair Yellen and President Elect Trump means that all bets are off. I sent you a letter this week in which I discussed protecting your assets in this environment. Please let me know if I can help you with your money.

Food for Thought: To put a fine point on it, it’s been a week of over-the-tops: First Up, Cornell University hosts a “Cry-In” for students traumatized by the Trump victory. Not a Sit-In. Not a Laugh-In. Not a Love-In. A Cry-In. While 300,000 teenagers serve in our military, the Cornell Masters of The Universe huddle with their barista supplied hot chocolates and bawl. Our take: All you overweened please decamp for Canada immediately. Second Up, Numerous people who were too preoccupied to vote have taken to the streets to protest the “Not My President” Trump election. Our take: You’ve successfully auditioned for The Kardashians. Third Up: This week a San Diego hi-tech entrepreneur threatened Donald Tump in a Facebook post. Facebook! Our take: The Peter Principal confirmed and the Wrath of The Secret Service, Homeland Security and the NSA shall rain down upon you. Kiss any more Venture Capital goodbye forever. The President of the U.S. has an annual salary of $400,000. Trump has announced that he will forgo the salary. Not a word from the mainstream media. The Greatest Show On Earth continues its unprecedented run! … and like you, I patiently wait for common sense and social grace to return to our Great Land. Thanks for reading More Money. If I can help you in any way please contact me at raymond.higgins@higginscapital.com. We Quarterback Money®.

Music of the Week: Tina Turner’s “Twenty Four Seven”